Madison, Wisconsin Mayor Orders Removal Of Two Confederate Monuments At Forest Hill Cemetery

August 18, 2017 § Leave a comment

Those of us who had successfully ended the display of Confederate flags at the Confederate rest area of the City of Madison, Wisconsin’s Forest Hill Cemetery had decided to leave the issue of the two Confederate monuments there to others.

Others have now acted.

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin ordered the removal of the those two Confederate monuments from the Confederate rest area.

One, plaque on a rock, has been removed. The other, a stone with the names of those buried in the rest area, will soon be removed by heavy equipment.


Replacement Marker Suggestions

University of Wisconsin history professor Stephen Kantrowitz states that a replacement informational marker will be needed.

That replacement marker can correct the historical inaccuracies of the current marker:

Unit

The plaque misidentifies the unit of the deceased Confederate POWs as the 1st Alabama Infantry Regiment. The correct name of the unit was the 1st Alabama, Tennessee, & Mississippi Infantry Regiment.

Flag

The plaque had two crossed Confederate battle flags.

The Confederate soldiers buried in Madison, Wisconsin may never have served under those flags on the plaque.

That battle flag was adopted by the Army of Northern Virginian in December, 1861. The soldiers buried in Madison were captured three months later in March, 1862 probably before Confederate units that far west on the Mississippi River had begun to use that as their battle flag.

Including the unit flag the 1st Alabama, Tennessee, & Mississippi Infantry Regiment on a replacement plaque is unnecessary. That can be left to displays in the nearby the Wisconsin State Historical Society’s museums.


Why Confederate Monuments Must Be Removed

Respecting Our Union Dead

The Confederate’s violent treason  resulted in the deaths of 360,000 to 432,000 members of our armed forces, some of whom are also buried in our Forest Hill Cemetery. The level of honor being accorded to the Confederates is a direct contradiction to our nation’s commitment to honor our veterans and respect their service.

The Relationship Among the Ideologies of the Confederates, the Nazis, and Apartheid

One of the clearest ways to understand this issue is what the Nazis did to comedian Mel Brooks when they captured him during the Battle of the Bulge in December, 1944.

In the Nazi racial hierarchy, Jews were subhumans and therefore not covered by the international laws of war on the treatment of POWs.  Starting on the first day of the war in 1939, the Nazis treated Jewish POWs differently. Captured Polish Jewish soldiers and officers (9% of the Polish armed forces) were summarily executed in the field.

The Nazis identified Mel Brooks as Jewish. Instead of sending him to a POW camp he was sent to the slave labor camp at Berga.

The Confederate ideology of racial supremacy viewed captured African-American Union soldiers as subhumans. Just as the Nazis did with captured Polish and American Jewish troops, instead of treating them as POWs they were either summarily executed in the field or made slaves as the Nazis did to Mel Brooks.

The Confederates and the Nazis treated POWs they judged as subhumans in same way because the Nazi ideology of racial supremacy is a direct line descendent of the Confederate ideology.

The Jim Crow South created by the ex-Confederate white supremacists after Reconstruction was almost identical to Apartheid South Africa because the ideologies of the Confederacy and Apartheid are also directly related.

Our archives and museums have plenty of room for Confederate statues, monuments, and memorials where they can be viewed and studied in their historical context. That we have failed to removed them from public spaces is among the reasons we have made so little progress on racial issues.


WWII German War Dead

Germans respectfully maintain the graves of their WWII war dead without flags with swastikas, monuments with the names of the dead in addition to the names on the gravestones, or plaques referring to their dead as “valiant” or “unsung heroes” as was on the plaque on the rock that was removed from the Confederate rest area of Madison’s Forest Hill Cemetery.

The time has come for us to do the same.


montdehusnesi_thumb.jpggerman

WWII German military cemetery, Mont-de-Huisnes, Normandy, France.

No flags with swastikas, no plaques about their “valiant dead” and “unsung heroes”, no additional monuments with lists of the dead, no statues of leaders on horseback or soldiers in glorified poses.

Photos by Cheryl A. Robinson, 2014


Acknowledgement:

Maise Brown of Jackson, Mississippi who’s much more difficult effort to remove the Confederate battle flag from her state’s flag inspired me to continue my advocacy.

In the Spring of 2016, Cheryl Robinson and I visited sites in Mississippi where Anson Croman served in the 20th Michigan during the Vicksburg Campaign. That included Jackson, Mississippi which after the surrender of Vicksburg, was temporarily liberated by Union troops including the 20th Michigan.

While in Jackson we read Maisie op-ed, “The ‘Cloth on the Stick’ Represents Hatred Toward Me,”

We connected and have been friends and supporters since.

I hope our successes in a much more supportive environment support her ongoing struggle in a much more difficult environment.
Maisie Brown


Sources and More Information:

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin orders removal of Confederate monuments at Forest Hill Cemetery by Logan Wroge Wisconsin State Journal August 17, 2017

High estimate of Union dead

New Estimate Raises Civil War Death Toll by By Guy Gugliotta New York Times April 2, 2012

Recounting the Dead by J. David Hacker September 20, 2011

Unit identification

1st Regiment, Alabama, Tennessee and Mississippi Infantry: National Park Service

Confederate Battle Flag History

The Confederate Battle Flag: America’s Most Embattled Emblem by John M. Coski, Harvard University Press, 2005


Previous Forest Hill Cemetery posts:

Display of Confederate Flags Ended In Forest Hill Cemetery (Madison, Wisconsin) June 20, 2017

Alders Working to End Confederate Flag Display in Forest Hill Cemetery October 17, 2016

2016 Memorial Display Rebuts Madison Parks’ 1st Amendment Argument June 1, 2016

Update on Confederate Flag Display in Madison Park May 27, 2016

International Practice Supports Ban on Confederate National Flag January 5, 2016

Ending the Display of Confederate Flags at Forest Hill Cemetery in Madison, Wisconsin  August 6, 2015

Honor Our Veterans By Taking Down the Confederate Flag from the South Carolina State Capitol Now June 20, 2015


Historical background and connections to current events are occasional features of my family history blogs.


Link: https://cromanmichigan.wordpress.com/2017/08/18/monuments

Minor revisions: August 19, 2017

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Display of Confederate Flags Ended In Forest Hill Cemetery (Madison, Wisconsin)

June 20, 2017 § Leave a comment

City of Madison (Wisconsin) Parks ended the display of Confederate flags at the Confederate Rest Section of the Forest Hill Cemetery by:

1. Removing the flagpole from the Confederate Rest Section where the Confederate flag had been permitted to be displayed once per year and on individual graves.

2. On May 10, 2017 the Board of Parks Commissioners unanimously revised the Cemetery Rules & Regulations to permit the display on graves or the cemetery flagpole of:

Many options are available under the revised Madison Parks policy to decorate the Confederate graves. For example, on May 28, 2016 they were decorated with traditional red corn poppies and the current flag of the U.S.

may282016

Red corn poppies on the Confederate graves. Current flag of the U.S. placed by Marshall Begel and Leonard Cizewski in front of the flagpole which has since been removed.

Photo by Leonard H. Cizewski


Decorating Confederate graves with flowers is also consistent with the earliest post Civil War traditions of “Decoration Day” where flowers were placed on graves of both Confederate and Union dead. Confederate flags.


Acknowledgements:

People have been working on this issue for at least 20 years.

Among those whose most recent efforts result in this success are:

My Alder Marsha Rummel who requested that our city attorney review the issue.

City attorney Michael May whose opinion provided the legal basis for the Madison Parks’ actions.

Alder Alder Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, whose district includes the cemetery, followed up with Madison Parks.

Parks superintendent Eric Knepp who worked with us on the issue for almost two years.

Carol Barry, Marshall Begel, Annie (Barry) Frederick, Cheryl Robinson, Jeff Spitzer-Resnick, and others provided support that included encouragement to continue my advocacy on this issue, research assistance proofreading and editing of my writing and remarks, and being my audience for my rehearsals of my Board of Parks remarks.

The late Anson Croman of the 20th Michigan Infantry Regiment, my wife Cheryl Robinson’s 2nd great-grandfather and my son Eli Cizewski-Robinson’s 3rd great-grandfather)Cheryl Robinson’s 2nd great-grandfather. Advocating for this issue continues the struggle for which he fought in the Civil War

Maise Brown of Jackson, Mississippi who’s much more difficult effort to remove the Confederate battle flag from her state’s flag inspired me to continue my advocacy:

In the Spring of 2016, Cheryl Robinson and I visited sites in Mississippi where Anson Croman served in the 20th Michigan during the Vicksburg Campaign. That included Jackson, Mississippi which after the surrender of Vicksburg, was temporarily liberated by Union troops including the 20th Michigan.

While in Jackson we read Maisie op-ed, “The ‘Cloth on the Stick’ Represents Hatred Toward Me,”

We connected and have been friends and supporters since.

Maisie Brown

Maisie Brown


Documents on Scribd:

Forest Hill (Madison, Wisconsin) Cemetery Rules Regulations, May 10, 2017

May 10, 2017 Minutes Meeting Board Of Park Commissioners City Of Madison Approval of Forest Hill Cemetery Rules & Regulations


Previous posts:

Alders Working to End Confederate Flag Display in Forest Hill Cemetery October 17, 2016

2016 Memorial Display Rebuts Madison Parks’ 1st Amendment Argument June 1, 2016

Update on Confederate Flag Display in Madison Park May 27, 2016

International Practice Supports Ban on Confederate National Flag January 5, 2016

Ending the Display of Confederate Flags at Forest Hill Cemetery in Madison, Wisconsin  August 6, 2015

Honor Our Veterans By Taking Down the Confederate Flag from the South Carolina State Capitol Now June 20, 2015


Sources and More Information:

Department of Veterans Affairs: Memorial Day History

Snopes: The Origins of Memorial Day


Historical background and connections to current events are occasional features of my family history blogs.


Link: https://cromanmichigan.wordpress.com/2017/06/20/endofdisplay/

Alders Working to End Confederate Flag Display in Forest Hill Cemetery

October 17, 2016 § Leave a comment

Two Madison alders are continuing the effort to end the display of the Confederate national flag on the flagpole in the Confederate rest section of Madison Parks’ Forest Hill Cemetery. Current policy allows the Confederate national flag (but not battle flag) to be displayed on Memorial and Veterans Days.

My alder Marsha Rummel, requested that our city attorney review the issue.


district6

Marsha A. Rummel,
District 6,
Council President Pro Tem


In response to her request, City attorney Michael May wrote:

It is my opinion that the City can restrict and limit access to and the content of flags upon the flagpole, or remove the flagpole altogether from the Confederate Rest Area. Indeed, eliminating the flying of Confederate flags from the flagpole would be consistent with recent steps taken by the federal government.

Complete text of the Madison city attorney’s opinion:


Alder Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, whose district includes the cemetery, is working with Madison Parks to draft a new policy that will prohibit the display of any Confederate symbols on the Madison Parks’ flagpole in the Confederate rest section of Forest Hill Cemetery.


district5

Shiva Bidar-Sielaff,
District 5

Alder Shiva Bidar-Sielaff’s goal is that a new policy will be in place before Memorial Day 2017.


Happy Birthday, Maisie Brown.

This blog is also my birthday present to our friend Maise Brown of Jackson, Mississippi who is working to remove the Confederate battle flag from her state’s flag

Maisie Brown turned 15 today.

Maisie’s far more difficult struggle to remove the Confederate battle flag from her Mississippi state flag inspires me to continue our far less difficult struggle to end the display of the Confederate national flag in our Forest Hill Cemetery.

Ending the unnecessary, inappropriate, or out of context displays of Confederate symbols wherever they occur is critical to dismantling the infrastructure of racism.


While serving in the Vicksburg Campaign in 1863, Anson Croman and the 20th MIchigan Infantry Regiment participated in the second capture of  Jackson, Mississippi in July, 1863.

While the Union was unable to hold Jackson at that time, the Union continued to hold Vicksburg which became the refuge for the 30,000 slaves from Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas liberated by the Vicksburg Campaign.

The Mitchells and Robinsons are direct line descendants of Anson Croman and he is my 2nd great-grandfather-in-law.


Previous posts:

2016 Memorial Display Rebuts Madison Parks’ 1st Amendment Argument June 1, 2016

Update on Confederate Flag Display in Madison Park May 27, 2016

International Practice Supports Ban on Confederate National Flag January 5, 2016

Ending the Display of Confederate Flags at Forest Hill Cemetery in Madison, Wisconsin  August 6, 2015

Honor Our Veterans By Taking Down the Confederate Flag from the South Carolina State Capitol Now June 20, 2015


Link: https://cromanmichigan.wordpress.com/2016/10/17/alders

2016 Memorial Display Rebuts Madison Parks’ 1st Amendment Argument

June 1, 2016 § Leave a comment

On Memorial Day, May 30, 2016, the Confederate Rest section of Madison Parks’ Forest Hill Cemetery was awash in symbols of the Confederacy.
awash.jpg
In addition to the first Confederate national flag on the Madison Parks’ flagpole, a Confederate national flag was on every one of the 140 graves.

Ironically two days earlier on May 28 each grave was decorated with an artificial red corn poppy, a traditional war grave decoration.
may282016.jpg

The red corn poppy is appropriate and is in accord with international practices as at German World Wars I and II military cemeteries in France where the current German national flag is flown but the display of WWI or II era German national, battle, or unit flags are prohibited. Floral and religious decorations of graves are permitted.

Those who removed the flowers at Forest Hill and replaced them with symbols of the Confederacy seem to be making a statement that this is not about decorating graves or respectful honoring of the dead but rather this is about supporting the Confederacy.

Those who have placed a Confederate flag on every grave have refuted the Madison Parks position that permitting the Confederate flag on the Madison Parks flagpole is about First Amendment rights

One hundred and forty flags seems more than enough expression of their First Amendment protected free speech. They do not need a 141st flag on the Madison Parks’ flagpole.

People who wish to display symbols of the violent treasonous attempt to set up a slave state based on an ideology of racial supremacy have no shortage of opportunities to do so including in Madison Parks.

The historical consensus is that the Confederacy was violent treasonous attempt to establish a slave state based on an ideology of racial supremacy. Post-Civil War displays of Confederate symbols were in opposition of civil rights for African-Americans and desegregation. They were intended as public statements of racial hatred.

Displays of Confederate symbols espouse racism, not the so-called preservation of “heritage and history” argument which are thinly veiled canards.

For 150 years we as a nation have engaged in collective denial of the racial aspects of the Civil War and subsequent events. One hundred and fifty years of displays of Confederate symbols is part of that denial. Among the reasons our racial problems remain so serious is because of that denial. Relegating Confederate symbols to their display in their appropriate context (for example the captured Confederate flags displayed at the Wisconsin Veterans Museum on the Capitol Square) is a essential step in ending that denialand dismantling the infrastructure of racism.

Madison Parks does not need to give them any  more than the Supreme Court requires and the Supreme Court does not require public cemeteries allow the flying of any Confederate flags on their flagpoles. (Griffin v. Department of Veterans Affairs 274 F. 3d 818 – Court of Appeals, 4th Circuit, 2001 Appeals court ruling that supported the policy of the Federal agencies to prohibit Confederate flags in national cemeteries. The Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal thereby allowing the appeals court ruling to stand.)

The time has come for Madison Parks to either prohibit the display of any flag other than the U.S. flag on the flagpole in the Confederate rest section of the Forest Hill Cemetery or to remove that flagpole.


All photos © 2016 Leonard H. Cizewski


Historical background and connections to current events are occasional features of my family history blogs.

The Musbachs and Robinsons are direct line descendants of Anson Croman and he is my 2nd great-grandfather-in-law.


Previous posts:

Update on Confederate Flag Display in Madison Park May 27, 2016

International Practice Supports Ban on Confederate National Flag January 5, 2016

Ending the Display of Confederate Flags at Forest Hill Cemetery in Madison, Wisconsin  August 6, 2015

Honor Our Veterans By Taking Down the Confederate Flag from the South Carolina State Capitol Now June 20, 2015


Acknowledgements:

Thanks to Jeff Spitzer-Resnick who encouraged me to continue my advocacy on this issue and who patiently edited my writing.

Thanks to Cheryl Robinson and Marshall Begel for their support and encouragement.

Thanks to Anson Croman. Advocating for this issue continues the struggle for which he fought in the Civil War

And thanks especially to Maise Brown of Jackson, Mississippi whose much more difficult effort to remove the Confederate battle flag from her state’s flag inspired me to continue my advocacy: “The ‘Cloth on the Stick’ Represents Hatred Toward Me,”


Shortlink: https://goo.gl/xkUpKW

Update on Confederate Flag Display in Madison Park

May 27, 2016 § Leave a comment

april302016.jpg
U.S. flag in the Confederate Rest Section in front of the flagpole on which the first Confederate national flag is allowed to be flown on Memorial Day.

Flag placed by Leonard H. Cizewski and Marshall Begel (his nephew-in-law) on April 30, 2016.

– Photo © Leonard H. Cizewski


Guest column in The Capital Times, May 27, 2016

Leonard H. Cizewski: Madison should ban Confederate flag at Forest Hill Cemetery (click for column on madison.com site)

On Memorial Day, the Confederate national flag (not the more commonly used and recognized Confederate battle flag) may again be flown over the Confederate Rest area in the Madison Parks’ Forest Hill Cemetery.

Last year, I asked the Madison Parks Department to discontinue that policy and only allow the flying of the U.S. flag.

I informed them that since they last reviewed the issue in 2001, the Supreme Court has ruled that prohibiting the flying of the Confederate flag in public cemeteries does not violate the First Amendment. I cited the policies of the National Park Service and the Veterans Administration.

That the Republican-majority House of Representatives just voted to end the display of the Confederate flag on flagpoles at cemeteries operated by the Veterans Administration should make even easier to end the display in Madison parks.

The Madison Parks Department responded by deciding to continue to allow the current policy, citing the First Amendment. That decision is an unnecessary and extreme overcompliance with the First Amendment.

The right to display the Confederate flag is not threatened, nor has it been. Our country is awash in displays of symbols of the Confederacy. Those who wish to display the Confederate flag have no shortage of times and places to display them: on their vehicles, at their homes, in their religious facilities, in their private schools, at demonstrations, and at private events on private property.

Those who wish to display the Confederate flag do not need the additional forum of a Madison park on Memorial Day.

In 2014 while in Normandy, France, for the 70th anniversary of the Normandy Campaign and a ceremony honoring my late father’s Signal Corp unit’s service in the liberation of Normandy, I visited the Mont de Huisnes WWII German Military Cemetery.

The only German flag allowed to be flown at that cemetery is the current German national flag. Neither the WWII German national flag nor the battle flags of the units under which the deceased fought are permitted. That is the international standard and practice — and that is what should be the policy of Madison parks.

Earlier this year my wife, Cheryl Robinson, and I followed the route that Anson Croman, her great-great-grandfather, traveled 150 years ago in the Vicksburg Campaign. He was in the 20th Michigan Infantry Regiment. After the fall of Vicksburg, the 20th was sent to recapture Jackson, Mississippi.

Our family’s ancestor was fighting not only to restore our nation but to liberate enslaved African-Americans. His actions resulted in the passage of amendments to our Constitution that are the basis for many of our current civil rights laws.

About 150 years ago General and Republican President Ulysses S. Grant said the cause Confederate flags represent “was … one of the worst for which a people ever fought.”

While in Jackson, Mississippi, we read an op-ed in the Jackson Free Press by Maisie Brown calling for the removal of the Confederate battle flag from the Mississippi state flag. Titled “The ‘Cloth on the Stick’ Represents Hatred Toward Me,” Brown echoed Grant’s words when she wrote that the Confederate battle flag on the Mississippi state flag illustrates “white supremacy and represents a group of people who wanted my people to stay enslaved.”

The Confederate national flags, the Confederate battle flag, or any Confederate symbols both 150 years ago and now represent an ideology of racial supremacy that was the basis of the enslavement of Africans in America.

Those buried in the Confederate section of Forest Hill Cemetery were committing violent treason as they waged war against our country in furtherance of that ideology of racial supremacy.

Germans today do not need to display Germany’s WWII national flag nor the unit or battle flags under which their war dead served in order to remember and honor their dead.

Descendents of the Confederate dead and others do not need to use the Confederate flag to honor their dead.

Among the reasons progress on racial issues has been so difficult is that for 150 years our nation has been in denial that an ideology of racial supremacy was central to the Confederacy. That denial is enabled when people are allowed to display a symbol of white supremacy under the canard of honoring the service of the war dead.

In recognition of general and President Grant’s insight, to honor the Union dead buried nearby, and in support of Maisie Brown, who faces a far more difficult struggle to remove the Confederate battle from her state’s flag, the time has come for the Madison Parks Department to join the rest the world and only permit the flying of our national flag in the Confederate Rest area of the Forest Hill Cemetery, or to remove the flagpole from the Confederate Rest area.

Madisonian Leonard H. Cizewski, a retired nurse, researches his family’s history. As a result of his research, in 2014 the Signal Corps unit in which his late father, Felix A. Cizewski, served was honored in Tamerville, France, as part of the observance of the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Normandy. (Click for blog post with more details.)


Historical background and connections to current events are occasional features of my family history blogs.

The Musbachs and Robinsons are direct line descendants of Anson Croman and he is my 2nd great-grandfather-in-law.


Acknowledgements:

Thanks to Jeff Spitzer-Resnick who encouraged me to continue my advocacy on this issue and who patiently edited my writing.

Thanks to Cheryl Robinson and Marshall Begel for their support and encouragement.

Thanks to Anson Croman. Advocating for this issue continues the struggle for which he fought in the Civil War

And thanks especially to Maise Brown of Jackson, Mississippi whose much more difficult effort to remove the Confederate battle flag from her state’s flag inspired me to continue my advocacy.


Revised: May 28, 2016

Shortlink: https://goo.gl/U4kFBK

Seneca Leader and Civil War General Ely Parker Named after Robinson Ancestor

February 23, 2016 § Leave a comment

ParkerMedaljpg.jpg
General Ely Samuel Parker (Hasanoanda) wearing his ancestor Red Jacket’s (Sagoyewatha) peace medal given to Red Jacket by President Washington in 1792.

Undated photo in the public domain.


Cheryl A. Robinson’s family oral history is that Seneca leader and Civil War General Ely Samuel Parker (Seneca name Hasanoanda) was named after Cheryl’s fifth paternal grandfather Eli Stone.


Extreme caution must be taken with family oral history especially when it involves European-Americans and American Indians. Much of such oral history turns out to be family mythology.


Research suggests that is not the case with this family oral history.

In his 1919 biography, The Life of Ely S. Parker: Last Grand Sachem of the Iroquois and General Grant’s Military Secretary, Arthur C. Parker states that:

(Hasanoanda) was named Ely after a prominent white citizen of the day.

Two sources identify that “prominent white citizen” as e Eli Stone, Cheryl’s fifth paternal great-grandfather.

Eli Stone was a Baptist missionary and one of the local founders of the mission on Seneca’s Tonawanda Reservation in New York.


Ely Samuel Parker (Hasanoanda) studied engineering and worked as a civil engineer.

Before the Civil War, the future General Grant and Ely Parker met in Galena, Illinois where Ely Parker was working on civil engineering projects. They became friends.

When the Civil War began, Ely Parker volunteered to serve. His offer was rejected because he was an American Indian. Ely Parker then contacted his friend Ulysses Grant who then a general.

General Grant who often (but now always) transcended the bigotry of his times obtained a captain’s commission for Ely Parker.

Captain Parker served as engineer including at the Siege of Petersburg

During the Siege of Petersburg, Ely Parker became Grant’s military secretary and was promoted to lieutenant colonel.

On April 9, 1865 at the surrender of the Confederates at Appomattox, Virginia, in his role as General Grant’s military secretarty, Lt. Col. Parker drafted the surrender documents for Generals Grant and Lee to sign.


elyparker.jpg

Then Lieutenant Colonel Ely Samuel Grant (seated on the right behind General Grant) at the  Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Virginia, April 9, 1865.

From a engraving from a drawing by Alfred R. Waud in the public domain.


After the signing of the surrender, General Lee shook hands with General Grant’s staff.

When he came to Lt. Col. Parker General Lee hesitated, looked at Parker, then  said “I am glad to see one real American here.” As General Lee was white supremacist, that remark could have been meant condescendingly rather than positively. In the racist racial hierarchy of the South in which General Lee believed and for which he fought, American Indians were viewed as inferiors barely one step above Africans.

In a moment of greatness, Lt. Col  Parker shook General Lee’s hand and replied,

“We are all Americans.”


While Lt. Col. Parker was facilitating the surrender of the Confederates, Cheryl A. Robinson’s third maternal great-grandfather Anson Croman was serving in the 20th Michigan Infantry Regiment securing the railroad station and repairing the rail lines at Sutherland Station, Virginia to the southeast of Appomattox just west of Petersburg.

Anson Croman and the 20th Michigan also served near General Parker at the Sieges of Vicksburg and Petersburg.


Links, sources, and more information:

The Life of Ely S. Parker: Last Grand Sachem of the Iroquois and General Grant’s Military Secretary by Arthur C. Parker. Full text in several digital formats.


Sources that identify Eli Stone as the person after whom General Ely Parker was named:

Ely Parker: Iroquois Chief and Union Officer

“He (General Parker) acquired his unusual first name (pronounced not ‘Ee-lye’ but ‘Ee-lee’) from a Baptist missionary, Elder Ely Stone.”

Ely Samuel Parker Facts

“Chief William Parker (General Parker’s father) owned a large farm on the reservation and became a converted member of the newly formed missionary Baptist church. Ely reputedly received his first name from Ely Stone, one of the local founders of the mission.”


Anson Croman and the 20th Michigan Infantry Regiment

Anson Croman and the 20th Michigan in the Appomattox Campaign 150 Years Ago

Includes documentation of General Lee’s white supremacist ideology.

150 Years Ago the 20th Michigan Enters Petersburg

150th anniversary of Anson Croman and the 20th Michigan at the 1863 siege of Vicksburg


Shortlink: http://bit.ly/1RkSnye

URL: https://cromanmichigan.wordpress.com/2016/02/23/seneca-leader-and-civil-war-general-ely-parker-named-after-hobart-ancestor

International Practice Supports Ban on Confederate National Flag

January 5, 2016 § Leave a comment

montepatano
From left to right: Soldiers in French,
German, and U.S. WWII uniforms
and holding their nations’ current flags at the
December 16, 2015 commemoration
of the 1944 Battle of Monte Pantano, Italy.

Fair use of photo by Eugenio Verrecchia


At the December 16, 2015 commemoration of the Battle of Monte Pantano, Italy, the German war dead were remembered with the current German national flag, not the WWII German flag.

That is the international standard.

That is further support for an end to the annual flying of the Confederate national flag at the Confederate rest section of the Forest Hill Cemetery in Madison, Wisconsin.

The only flag that should be permitted is the U.S. flag.


Historical background and connections to current events are occasional features of my family history blogs.


Shortlink; http://wp.me/p5YuOj-2F

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